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Tag Archives: Global

Charts: Global Semiconductor Industry

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Chart: Institute of International Finance Forecast Global Recession in 2023


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Source : Twitter

Infographic: A Global Look At Wealth and Happiness

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Income Inequality and Happiness

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Source : Visual Capitalist

Charts: UN FAO Global Food Price Index Fell in September 2022

The Index has fallen for six consecutive months.

World food prices remain above levels that triggered 2010/11 Arab Spring.

Source : Bloomberg

Chart: The Global Wealth Pyramid

Source : Statista

Singapore Overtakes Hong Kong in World Financial Centers Ranking

Alex Millson wrote . . . . . . . . .

Singapore has overtaken Hong Kong to become Asia’s top financial center — and the third in the world — according to a new report that puts New York and London in the first and second spots.

Hong Kong slipped to fourth place, battered by strict Covid restrictions and an exodus of talent, while San Francisco moved up two spots to round out the Global Financial Centres Index’s top five.

Hong Kong is struggling to revive its role as a global finance hub as it continues to follow China’s lead in trying to keep Covid cases to a minimum, while the rest of the world opens up. A November summit of global bankers, designed to restore confidence in the city, has secured pledges from some 20 leading firms to send top executives. But uncertainty surrounding the easing of quarantine rules, which has kept visitor numbers low, still threatens to affect turnout.

Singapore, on the other hand, is expecting to see more than 4 million visitors in 2022. A slate of high-profile events including the Milken Institute Asia Summit, the Forbes Global CEO Conference and the Singapore Grand Prix will help to raise the city’s profile as a travel destination.

The Chinese cities of Shanghai, Beijing and Shenzhen all maintained spots in the GFCI’s top 10, in spite of crippling Covid mitigation measures that have effectively cut the country off from the rest of the world.

Other findings in the report were:

  • Paris made a return to the top 10, while Tokyo tumbled to 16th place
  • Sydney leapt 10 spots up the ranks to number 13
  • Dubai and Abu Dhabi reigned supreme in the Middle East, sitting in 17th and 32nd place respectively
  • Russian financial centers suffered as a result of the war in Ukraine, with Moscow down 22 places to 73, and St Petersburg falling 17 places to 114
  • Barbados, Xi’an and Wuhan were the bottom three locations on the list

The index, compiled by think tanks Z/Yen Partners and the China Development Institute, ranks 119 financial centers and uses data collected from thousands of financial services professionals responding to an online questionnaire.


Source : BNN Bloomberg

Chart: Global YoY Inflation in May 2022


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Source : Deutsche Bank

Charts: Global Recorded Music Revenues Grew 18.5% in 2021


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Source : IFPI

IMF Slashes U.S. and China Growth Forecasts

Julia Horowitz wrote . . . . . . . . .

The pandemic will continue to stoke uncertainty and inflation in its third year, undermining the global recovery from the coronavirus and pushing total economic losses toward $14 trillion.

That’s according to the International Monetary Fund, which on Tuesday slashed its global growth forecast for 2022 by half a percentage point to 4.4%. The group said the world’s two largest economies, the United States and China, would grow more slowly than it predicted in October.

The IMF sees America’s economic output increasing 4% this year after rising by 5.6% in 2021. It shaved 1.2 percentage points off its previous forecast due to “lower prospects” that Congress will pass President Joe Biden’s Build Back Better economic plan, lingering supply chain disruption and the rising chance of aggressive action by the Federal Reserve to rein in inflation.

In China, economic growth for 2022 is now pegged at 4.8%, 0.8 percentage points lower than previously expected and a marked slowdown from the 8.1% growth achieved in 2021. The IMF pointed to the ongoing pullback in the country’s huge real estate sector and a “weaker-than-expected” recovery in personal spending.

The IMF now expects the pandemic to have cost the world $13.8 trillion in lost economic output by the end of 2024. While advanced economies are expected to return to their pre-pandemic trajectories this year, that’s not the case for “several emerging markets and developing economies,” which are still poised to suffer “sizable output losses.”

“The last two years reaffirm that this crisis and the ongoing recovery is like no other,” Gita Gopinath, the IMF’s first deputy managing director, said in a blog post. “Policymakers must vigilantly monitor a broad swath of incoming economic data, prepare for contingencies, and be ready to communicate and execute policy changes at short notice.”

Rising prices present a major challenge. The IMF revised up its estimates for global inflation, predicting that “elevated price pressures [are] expected to persist for longer.”

It now sees consumer prices rising 3.9% in advanced economies this year and 5.9% in emerging market and developing economies — sharper increases than were recorded in 2021, when consumer prices rose 3.1% and 5.7%, respectively.
Inflation in advanced economies is expected to fall back toward 2%, the target for most major central banks, in 2023. But the IMF said that a number of conditions will need to be met.

Assuming expectations for inflation don’t get out of hand and “the pandemic eases its grip, higher inflation should fade as supply chain disruptions ease, monetary policy tightens, and demand rebalances away from goods-intensive consumption towards services,” the IMF said.

The organization emphasized that its forecast is “subject to high uncertainty.” It’s on alert for new variants of the coronavirus that could prolong the pandemic, fresh damage to supply chains due to China’s policy of suppressing all Covid outbreaks, and “higher inflation surprises” in the United States that could force the Fed to be even more aggressive with interest rate hikes.

It also cited “rising geopolitical tensions and social unrest” as risks to the outlook. Western countries are currently engaged in a high-stakes standoff with Russia to avert an invasion of Ukraine.


Source : CNN

Chart: The World’s Most Powerful Militaries

Source : Statista