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Tag Archives: Car

Chart: U.S. New and Used Vehicle Prices Have Soared Since the Start of the Pandemic


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Source : GRID

Charts: China Car Export

Western Europe and Southeast Asia became the main destinations for China’s new energy vehicle (NEV) exports, accounting for nearly half of all cars sold overseas during the first six months this year, according to the China Passenger Car Association (CPCA).

China exported 362,200 NEVs in the first half, more than double from the previous year, Cui Songshu, secretary general of the CPCA, said over the weekend citing customs data. Exports to Western European countries reached 122,700 autos, accounting 34% of total exports, while sales to Southeast Asia came to 58,400 units, or 16% of the total, Cui said.

Source : Bloomberg and Caixin


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Black Box for New Cars Now Mandatory in the EU

Marie-Julie Van de Sijpe wrote . . . . . . . . .

From July 2022 onwards, all cars, trucks and buses manufactured in Europe will now have to be equipped with a black box, just like in airplanes.

The principle was voted on in the European Parliament in 2019, with the aim of improving road safety. The new rules for the road only apply to vehicles that are new to the market – people who drive around with a somewhat older car do not have to change cars or get one installed.

The new black box for cars comes with all sorts of safety applications: it records all driving data from speed and acceleration, to belt use and braking.

It also includes advanced systems that assist drivers to stick to the speed limit. Moreover, there is an option to install an alcohol lock.

Just like in airplanes, the device would come with an in-vehicle data recorder for incidents, with the difference being that it will not record any conversations inside the vehicle.

It will be easier for experts to access the driver’s data, as it helps to provide liability in case of serious accidents, by simply providing information about the first 30 seconds before and 10 seconds after the impact.

“It will be useful for serious accidents, which are a minority in relation to the total number of cases. The judicial authorities will not ask for the data after every accident. There are only 7,000 to 8,000 serious accidents out of 45,000 bodily injury accidents each year,” Benoît Godart, road safety spokesman at the Vias Institute, told La Libre.

Some motorists’ associations are not pleased with this decision and see it as “an additional cost for new cars”.

“The price of the device is about a hundred euros. This will be reflected in the price of the car and will also be included in the insurance,” Pierre Chasseray, general delegate of the French association “40 million motorists”, told France Info on Monday.

The black box mandate will be extended to private cars and other second-hand commercial vehicles from 2024 onwards.


Source : The Brussels Times

Chart: Global Passenger Vehicles Sales by Powertrain

Source : Bloomberg

New U.S. Vehicles Must Average 40 mpg by 2026, Up from 28 mpg

Tom Krisher wrote . . . . . . . . .

The National Highway Traffic Safety Administration said its new fuel economy requirements are the strongest to date and the maximum the industry can achieve over the time period. They will reduce gasoline consumption by more than 220 billion gallons over the life of vehicles, compared with the Trump standards.

They’re expected to decrease carbon dioxide emissions — but not as much as some environmentalists want — and raise new vehicle prices in an industry already pressed by inflation and supply chain issues.

For the current model year, standards enacted under Trump require the fleet of new vehicles to get just under 28 miles per gallon in real-world driving. The new requirements increase gas mileage by 8% per year for model years 2024 and 2025 and 10% in the 2026 model year.

Transportation Secretary Pete Buttigieg, whose department includes NHTSA, said the rules also will help strengthen national security by making the country less dependent on foreign oil and less vulnerable to volatile gasoline prices. Gasoline nationwide has spiked to an average of more than $4.22 per gallon, with much of the increase coming since Russia, a major oil producer, invaded Ukraine in late February. It cost $2.88 per gallon just a year ago, according to AAA.

Gas prices also have helped to fuel inflation to a 40-year high, eating up household budgets and hitting President Joe Biden’s approval ratings.

“Transportation is the second-largest cost for American families, only behind housing,” Buttigieg said. The new standards, he said, will help keep the U.S. more secure and preserve “the freedom of our country to chart its future without being subject to other countries and to the decisions that are being made in the boardrooms of energy companies.”

But auto dealers say more stringent requirements drive up prices and push people out of an already expensive new-car market. NHTSA projects that the new rules will raise the price of a new vehicle in the 2029 model year by $1,087.

Trump’s administration rolled back fuel economy standards, allowing them to rise 1.5% per year, which environmental groups said was inadequate to limit planet-warming greenhouse gas emissions that fuel climate change. The standards had been rising about 5% per year previously.

But the new standards won’t immediately match those adopted through 2025 under President Barack Obama. NHTSA officials said they will equal the Obama standards by 2025 and slightly exceed them for the 2026 model year.

The Obama-era standards automatically adjusted for changes in the type of vehicles people are buying. When they were enacted in 2012, 51% of new vehicle sales were cars and 49% SUVs and trucks. Last year, 77% of new vehicle sales were SUVs and trucks, which generally are less efficient than cars.

Some environmental groups said the new requirements from NHTSA under Biden don’t go far enough to fight global warming. Others supported the new standards as a big step toward reducing emissions, with the American Lung Association calling for even stronger standards to drive a transition to all new vehicles having zero-emissions by 2035.

“Climate change has gotten much worse, but these rules only require automakers to reduce gas-guzzling slightly more than they agreed to cut nine years ago,” said Dan Becker, director of the Safe Climate Transport Center at the Center for Biological Diversity.

Officials said that under the new standards, owners would save about $1,400 in gasoline costs during the lifetime of a 2029 model year vehicle. Carbon dioxide emissions would drop by 2.5 billion metric tons by 2050 under the standards, the NHTSA said.

Automakers are investing billions of dollars to develop and build electric vehicles but say government support is needed to get people to buy them. The companies want government tax credits to reduce prices as well as more money for EV charging stations to ease anxiety over running out of juice.

John Bozzella, CEO of the Alliance for Automotive Innovation, a large industry trade group, said increased regulations will require supportive government policies. Regulators should consider safety, consumer buying preferences, improved fuel economy and the transition to electric vehicles, he said in a statement.

NHTSA sets fuel economy requirements, while the Environmental Protection Agency develops limits on greenhouse gas emissions. NHTSA officials said their requirements nearly match rules adopted in December by the EPA, so automakers don’t have to comply with two rules.


Source : AP

Toyota Dethrones GM as U.S. Sales Leader After Nearly a Century on Top

David Shepardson wrote . . . . . . . . .

Japanese automaker Toyota Motor Corp outsold General Motors Co in the United States in 2021, marking the first time the Detroit automaker has not led U.S. auto sales for a full year since 1931.

Toyota sold 2.332 million vehicles in the United States in 2021, compared with 2.218 million for General Motors, the automakers said on Tuesday.

GM’s U.S. sales were down 13% for 2021 – and down 43% in the fourth quarter – while Toyota was up 10% for the year. GM last had lower sales in 2010 at 2.202 million.

For all of 2020, GM’s U.S. sales totaled 2.55 million, compared with Toyota’s 2.11 million and Ford Motor Co’s (F.N) 2.04 million.

Last year was marred by a shortage of semiconductors used heavily in vehicles, forcing automakers to focus on their most profitable models.

GM said on Tuesday it expects U.S. economic growth will boost U.S. total light-duty vehicle industry sales from around 15 million in 2021 to around 16 million in 2022.

GM has been the largest seller of vehicles in the United States since 1931, when it surpassed Ford, according to data from industry publication Automotive News.

Toyota is not boasting about the accomplishment. Senior Vice President Jack Hollis said the automaker is “grateful” for its loyal customers, but “being No. 1 is never a focus or priority.”

The Japanese automaker does not see it as sustainable that it can retain its U.S. sales lead and had no plans to use the 2021 accomplishment in any kind of advertising, he added. Toyota had been credited by analysts for weathering the chip shortage better than other automakers.

GM spokesman Jim Cain said the Detroit automaker had a very strong sales year in the United States in full-size SUVs and pickup trucks as it has focused on profitability, and as the supply of semiconductors improves, so will sales.

“I wouldn’t rush out if I were (Toyota), and get a ‘We’re No. 1’ tattoo,” he said.

GM under Chief Executive Mary Barra also has emphasized profitability over volume, abandoning such money-losing markets as Europe and Russia.

BULLISH ON 2022

For the entire industry, Cox Automotive forecast U.S. new vehicle sales in December will be down 32% year-on-year – the slowest pace since May 2020, when the country remained mostly closed during the first wave of the COVID-19 pandemic.

Industry analysts forecast around 15 million vehicles sold for all of 2021 in the United States. U.S. vehicle sales will remain well below the five-year average of 17.3 million from 2015-2019.

IHS Markit forecasts U.S. sales are expected to reach nearly 15.5 million in 2022, up an estimated 2.6% from the projected 2021 level of approximately 15.1 million vehicles.

Toyota sees industry sales jumping to 16.5 million this year, with demand even higher if the industry can boost production further, with its own sales topping 2.4 million.

“If you would have asked me to predict how the year was going to go at the beginning of (last) January, I would have gotten it all wrong because this whole microchip shortage just came out of left field and it wreaked a lot of havoc,” Hyundai Motor America sales chief Randy Parker said in an interview. “But at the same time, it sharpened our skill set.”

“I’m very bullish on 2022,” he added. Hyundai’s U.S. sales last year rose 19% to more than 738,000 vehicles, including a record number on the retail side.


Source : Reuters

Video:中國车辆55公里每小时高速翻滚测试首次公开

Infographic: The 35 Vehicles With the Longest Production Runs

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Source : Visual Capitalist

Chart: Diesel And Petrol Cars Losing Ground in the EU

Source : Statista

Chart: Market Cap and Production of Tesla vs. Total of Major Global Automakers

Source : Twitter